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CONFIDENTIAL SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES

OUR SERVICES

We provide LGBTQ+ services, including hormone therapy and gender-affirming care in addition to a variety of confidential,

on-site sexual and reproductive health services in a supportive, culturally appropriate environment.


Call 603-626-9500 for more information about...

Finding the best method of birth control for you

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Emergency Contraception

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STD education, testing, and treatment

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Abstinence Education

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Walk-in

pregnancy testing

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Achieving pregnancy on your schedule

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 It’s totally normal to think about sex, but it’s very important to consider whether or not you’re prepared to have sex. No matter what, it’s helpful to have a trusted adult that you can talk to, and your Amoskeag Health provider can be that person. In the meantime, these resources can help you learn a little bit more about your body and what might happen when you have sex.

Let's Talk About Sex

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS & DISEASES (STIs & STDs)

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN STIs & STDs?

STIs (sexually transmitted infections) and STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) are basically the same thing! So, why do people sometimes say “infection” instead of “disease”? The word “disease” can make people think of a visual problem, but a lot of STDs don’t have any signs or symptoms – they’re an infection that you might not see. That’s why it’s so important to get screened if you are sexually active. That way, your doctor can help you if you need it.

Learn more about STDs:

HOW DO I GET STDs?

STDs are caused by bacteria, viruses, and even tiny insects! You can get a STD by having sexual contact with someone who has one. Sexual contact can mean intercourse or putting your mouth, hands, or genitals on someone else’s genitals. Remember, even if they can’t get pregnant, women who have sex with women are also at risk for STDs.

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WHAT ARE DIFFERENT TYPES OF STDs?

WHAT HAPPENS IF I GET A STD?

STDs are all different. Some can be treated and cured. But you can still get the STD again if you have sex—especially unprotected sex—with an infected person. Ask your provider about treatments for your partner, otherwise you could give each other the infection back and forth. Some STDs can’t be cured, but you can help manage the symptoms. There are also a few STDs that can be life threatening without treatment.

CONDOMS DO'S AND DON'TS
  • DO use a condom every time you have sex.

  • DO put on a condom before having sex.

  • DO read the package and check the expiration date.

  • DO make sure there are no tears or defects.

  • DO store condoms in a cool, dry place.

  • DO use latex or polyurethane condoms.

  • DO use water-based or silicone-based lubricant
    to prevent breakage.

  • DON’T store condoms in your wallet as heat and friction can
    damage them.

  • DON’T use nonoxynol-9 (a spermicide), as this can cause irritation.

  • DON’T use oil-based products like baby oil, lotion, petroleum jelly, or cooking oil because they will cause the condom to break.

  • DON’T use more than one condom at a time.

  • DON’T reuse a condom.

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PREGNANCY

PREVENTING PREGNANCY

Not having sexual intercourse – otherwise known as abstinence – is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy. But there are still birth control options that you can use when you aren’t ready to become pregnant.

HAVING A HEALTHY PREGNANCY ON YOUR SCHEDULE

Whether or not you’re interested in having a baby, it’s important to take care of your body by staying active and eating the right food. And if you ARE interested in one day having a baby, it’s important to talk to your provider about “Preconception health.” Preconception health is talking about how to take care of yourself so that you can have a healthy baby.

If you are ready to have a baby, please talk to your provider. They can help you plan and prepare for a healthy pregnancy. You can schedule an appointment by calling 603-626-9500.

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RELATIONSHIPS

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Relationships can be tough. It’s important to treat your friends and partners with respect. You deserve that respect as well. Boundaries are so important when you’re creating relationships. When you explore having sex with your partner, you need to have honest and open discussions. No one should feel forced to have sex if they are not ready or do not want to. If you are feeling unsafe with your partner, please tell someone!

If you are interested in learning more about boundaries and consent, check out these resources from Bedsider:

Sometimes, dating is complicated. Maybe your family doesn’t approve of your partner, you’re struggling to date in the LGBTQ+ community, or you’re not sure how to end an unhealthy relationship. If you can relate to any of those situations, then love is respect can help!

Relationships aren’t all about romance. Are you struggling to make friends, get along with your family, or work out problems in ALL of your relationships? GirlsHealth.gov can help you learn how to communicate and form healthy relationships.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS:

IS SOMEONE MAKING YOU NERVOUS OR UNCOMFORTABLE?

No one ever has the right to abuse you! Sometimes, abuse isn’t physical. People can also hurt you by using unkind words meant to bring you down or by trying to control your actions. If you are threatened or hurt by your partner, help is available. It can be very hard to get up the courage to leave a partner who is hurting you (especially if you love them), and it can be a very complicated situation. But it’s not your fault and there are resources to help you.

If you don’t feel safe in your relationship, please call 603-626-9500 and ask to speak with a case manager at Amoskeag Health or visit New Hampshire 211.

How can you identify abuse? Click here to learn more.

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FOR PARENTS OF TEENS

It’s challenging to parent a teenager! But open and honest two-way communication about sex and their bodies can help keep your teen educated and safe. Helping your teen build a trusting relationship with their healthcare provider is essential.

 

Visit the sites below for some helpful hints on how to talk to your teen:

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